The Sakho Debate

The Sakho Debate

Is there another player that divides opinion more than Mamadou Sakho? I know he isn’t in a red shirt at the moment, but this debate is starting to brew – therefore I thought I’d finally put it to bed.

To be honest, it’s starting to get a wee bit irrelevant. Whenever our defence struggles to keep or clean sheet or after we win/lose a game, the first thing I hear from Liverpool fans is ‘Sakho’. There have been subsets of supporters moaning at Jurgen Klopp’s decision to loan him out to Crystal Palace, where he has notably impressed:

https://twitter.com/Squawka/status/848291653744025600

It’s understandable to feel frustrated that he’s turned into the Rock Of Gibraltar graced with a very reliable centre-back partner (what we’d do for one!) in James Tomkins or Scott Dann. But, it’s starting to get far too repetitive hearing people tweet ‘#FreeSakho’ or demanding Klopp to return him to the first team. It is frankly a blasphemy to be bringing up something as irrelevant as that after winning a derby.

We may be shite at defending set-pieces an’ all, but why? Just… why?

Now, like I’ve already said, it’s very understandable to be frustrated that he is surrounded by a centre-back partner who can get the best out of the Frenchman but we lack one to complement Matip. I just think this whole ‘debate’ needs a bit of context.

So, let’s take a trip down memory lane to the summer of 2014. Liverpool had finished 2nd into the Premier League. You may not think this is relevant yet. But after selling Luis Suarez and left with Daniel Sturridge, Fabio Borini and Rickie Lambert as our striking options, we needed a world-class striker like Suarez who could supplant Sturridge if the Englishman suffered from injury.

After a failed attempt to sign Loic Remy due to a failed medical, manager Brendan Rodgers turned to Mario Balotelli as the man who could potentially thrive in his second spell in England as well as possibly steering us to a second successive title challenge. All was set for a successful first season in Merseyside. Surely?

But it was never going to go down as a categorical success story. Some of you may think I’m an idiot for comparing Balotelli with Sakho – I’m not; what I am trying to get at is that they can be similar in some veins. Both can be the best in the league when they’re in the mood – but there are occasions where they just fail to conduct themselves in the manner expected from a professional footballer.

I feel Jurgen Klopp has learnt from the mistake his predecessor made – Brendan Rodgers. He was willing to sign players to had an awful attitude but a talent which needed to be shown more consistently. His counterpart has opted for attitude instead; which has paid dividends.

Attitude is the norm in any footballer. You look around at world-class players, they are not just there because of their talent. They work as professionals. On and off the pitch they always conduct themselves in a manner expected. Mamadou Sakho was regarded as a cult hero by some following his formidable performances in the Europa League. After being cleared from a failed drugs test last season, he had the chance to learn from this judgement.

But instead, his behaviour off the pitch has manifestly gone backwards and his misdemeanours increased rapidly.

He arrived late for the flight to the United States in July, immaturely interrupted a Klopp interview on LFCTV as well as missing a team meal. Predominantly, he generally failed to conduct himself in the manner expected of an international footballer. Sakho made the mistake of getting on the wrong side of Klopp – who seems like a very laid-back, friendly and eccentric manager on the outside. But he got on the ruthless side of him; subsequently paying the consequence.

I just feel this is Sakho’s own making. Klopp’s detractors who resort to saying that he held a grudge against the Frenchman from minute one are wearing rose-tinted glasses in my opinion.

This is all Sakho. All of it. I could even harp on about that Snapchat outburst in September; but I don’t want this to become an article where I just bash Mamadou. Because he has many traits: strong, powerful, good on the ball, an aptitude to read the game as well as being a natural leader.

However, that means nothing in the modern day unfortunately. And there is no exception under Jurgen Klopp – renowned for craving team camaraderie. I feel that managers are influenced by what they see off the pitch and in training – maybe that’s why Jurgen isn’t giving any second chances to Mamadou.

I just don’t envisage Sakho being handed another opportunity to prove himself. He can go and hug the German all day – but it’ll make no difference at the end of the day.

If there is a player that is damaging a club of Liverpool’s stature time and time again with public misdemeanours, – I’m afraid Mamadou Sakho should never be wearing a Red shirt again. Even sites like William Hill won’t have odds on Sakho playing at Liverpool again and a move to pastures new will only benefit his career to avoid turning off any more potential suitors.

Barring his very unlikely return – in that case, please ignore all of the above. Cheerio.

by

Feature writer on Anfield Index. I bleed Liverpool by nature. Bachelor's in Journalism, but write about my beloved Reds when I find the time.

http://wakelet.com/@stelindelllfc

Comments

8 responses to “The Sakho Debate”

  1. boom says:

    Besides the childish antics he was a nervous wreck when playing. He tried to look calm but every fan felt like he is capable of something unbelievablystupid here.. Dont worry he is the honeymoon period at palace.. wait untill the spotlight is on him for crazy bizzare w. t. f mistakes… Lfc have conceeded 34 or is it 37 goals and you might think klopp has done f. All to improve our defence. But other stats tell a different story… Shots against us plus chances created for the opposition have decreased by about 30%..klopp will sort it out with a few more tweaks… In this age of a million screaming opinions look at facts rather than some outburst on twitter

  2. Sherief Razzaque says:

    And what of Firmino’s drink driving?

    Sakho lowered Klopp’s patience threshold when he took those weight loss pills and destroyed any goodwill by the action of nearly a flight and being late for meals and medical sessions. He is largely culpable for his own fate, but I hope there’s a chance for reconciliation.

  3. Ste Lindell says:

    Agreed, its all his own making. Klopp is unlikely to want him back after what’s happened.

  4. Jose says:

    Even in our own personal and work lives, when you say “one more and you’re done!” Then you’ve got to stick by it regardless or soon everyone will be looking for passes and special treatment. I say take the Sakho money, markovic, and 10 mil and go get us vvd.

  5. Carl Mackintosh says:

    For the most I back Klopps decisions but I’m afraid this one goes down as a mistake, Sakho is proving at Crystal Palace what a good player he is & his type is exactly what we are missing, a leader is defence. Granted he has made mistakes but there appears to be no problems at Palace, I’d say once his loan is finished bring him back. Also for all of those people who are saying bring in VVD, well I don’t see that happening as we’ll be outbid by both Chelsea & Man City so thats all a pipe dream and would cost around £60m.

  6. Stephen Lindell says:

    Carl

    I can understand your anguish like many supporters [including me] – but I just don’t think there’ll be any way he’s going to persuade Klopp that he is worthy of a place in this Liverpool side. In my opinion he failed to conduct himself as expected of a Liverpool and international footballer. Even if the pursue of Van Dijk doesn’t end up as expected, there are other defenders I think who’ll be willing to join with CL football and decent wages (e.g Jonathan Tah).

    But I agree, he was the leader we lacked. But he certainly didn’t perform like one.

  7. Sowellred says:

    Why is no-one talking about his string of 5/10 performances last season – it’s like some think he’s the new Maldini

  8. Stephen Lindell says:

    He did have a poor run of form, that’s true – towards the festive period of last season he wasn’t great. But he peaked in the latter stages of the campaign.

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Published by Anfield Index
Updated: 2017-06-16 10:45:01
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